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Create Characters Agents & Editors Love For Middle Grade and YA Novels: Nov. 14 Webinar by Cheryl Klein (of Harry Potter Editing Fame)

Categories: Children's Writing, Chuck Sambuchino's Guide to Literary Agents Blog, Getting Published, Webinars, What's New.

Readers may buy novels for their storylines—the facts that they can learn from the flap copy or an Internet blurb. But readers love books for their characters, because compelling characters bring feeling and meaning to what would otherwise be a mere list of events (also known as the plot). And if you’re trying to hook an agent or editor, nothing will make your opening chapters stand out more than truly distinctive characters: fictional people, whom you have made real, who compel that agent or editor to want to find out what happens next.

In this live webinar — titled “Create Characters Agents & Editors Love For Middle Grade and YA Novels” — Arthur A. Levine Books/Scholastic executive editor Cheryl Klein will teach you multiple strategies for getting readers interested and invested in your characters. She’ll draw on examples from popular middle-grade and YA novels to show you how successful authors work their magic, and provide a solid, actionable list of techniques that can be applied singly or in combination to strengthen your characterizations, from your protagonist and villain down to your supporting cast. By the end of the webinar, you’ll be well equipped to create characters who make agents and editors want to read more of your work, and eventually keep all readers turning the pages. It all happens at 1 p.m., EST, Thursday, Nov. 14, 2013, and lasts for 90 minutes.

 

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WHAT YOU’LL LEARN:

  • The four types of emotional bonds that readers can have with characters
  • How to choose the reader-character bond that will be most useful to what you want to accomplish in your book
  • How middle-grade and YA protagonists differ from adult protagonists—and each other
  • Multiple strategies for getting readers invested in your characters
  • How to make characters appealing to readers
  • The dialogue tags and behavior patterns that turn readers off
  • How to apply the techniques you learn in a revision. Sign up for the webinar here.

INSTRUCTOR

Cheryl Klein is the executive editor at Arthur A. Levine Books, an imprint of Scholastic Inc., where she edits a wide range of books for children and young adults, including Words in the Dust by Trent Reedy, an Al Roker’s Book Club for Kids selection on the Today Show, and A Curse Dark as Gold by Elizabeth C. Bunce, the winner of the inaugural William C. Morris Award for Best Young Adult Novel. She also served as the continuity editor for the last two books of the Harry Potter series. Cheryl is the author of Second Sight: An Editor’s Talks on Writing, Revising, and Publishing Books for Children and Young Adults, as well as a frequent cohost of the Narrative Breakdown podcast, at http://www.thenarrativebreakdown.com. Please visit her on the web at http://www.cherylklein.com, http://chavelaque.blogspot.com, and @chavelaque.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?

  1. Writers of middle-grade and YA novels
  2. Writers who struggle with starting their stories
  3. Writers who want to deepen their characterizations
  4. Writers who excel at plot, but have trouble with character
  5. Writers who hope to make the unique qualities of their characters more present on the page

 

Sign up for the webinar here!

 

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One Response to Create Characters Agents & Editors Love For Middle Grade and YA Novels: Nov. 14 Webinar by Cheryl Klein (of Harry Potter Editing Fame)

  1. Scorpiaux says:

    “… readers love books for their characters, because compelling characters bring feeling and meaning to what would otherwise be a mere list of events (also known as the plot).”

    One would think this is literary gospel. It probably is looked at in that way since there are so many good and great novels written with compelling characters. BUT there are readers who look at the big picture and while the characters may be fascinating, the events drive the story and that can also be the reason the pages get turned. In doomsday stories or epic battle stories entire civilizations get wiped out and what happens to one individual (with limited POV I might add) is of little consequence to the reader. If the earth gets blown to bits by an asteroid, personalities with their words matter for little. A story with the earth destroyed and a few survivors (or no survivors) can be just as riveting as one with a comet rider hero who destroys the comet.

    A good writer can make an event driven story as compelling as a character driven story.

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