How to Write Poetry, Writing Poetry

No matter what form of poetry you write, you’ll find insights and advice here for improving your skill and word usage, enhancing your creativity, and mastering every form of poetry.

Literary Journal Submissions 101

To submit your latest short story, essay or poem, you’ll need a cover letter—which is much different from a query. Use these tips from inside a creative writing program to help your letter make the grade.

Historical Fiction Spotlight: Paula McLain

Paula McLain’s latest book is the bestselling The Paris Wife, a fictional account of Ernest Hemingway’s first marriage and upstart years in 1920s Paris, told from the point of view of his wife, Hadley. The author of two poetry collections, a memoir and an earlier novel, McLain holds a Master of Fine Arts in...

How to Cook Up a Poetry Jam (Guest Post by Daniel Ari)

Please welcome Daniel Ari, who has offered up a guest post on how to start a poetry jam. Ari has been putting writing jams together since he was an undergrad. In the late 90s, he had a long-running group called “Poetry Slide,” and nowadays, he hosts monthly sessions at home for reading and writing...

Poetic Form: Qasida (Guest Post by Ren Powell)

Please welcome Ren Powell, whose most recent book is Mercy Island, New and Selected Poems–available through Phoenicia Publishing or Amazon. She is an associate editor with Poemeleon and blogs at http://tribeofmadorphans.com. In the following post, she introduces us to the poetic form called qasida.   ***** While I was putting together my research proposal...

How to Celebrate National Poetry Month: Guest Post by Nancy Posey

Please welcome our own Nancy Posey as she discusses ideas for celebrating National Poetry Month in April (outside of participating in the Poetic Asides April PAD Challenge). As many of you may know, Nancy is a frequent participant in the Poetic Asides challenges–even winning the 2009 November PAD Chapbook Challenge (read an interview with...

How to Create Animated Poetry: Guest Post by Sheila Moore

Please welcome today’s guest blogger Sheila Moore, who is a published author, avid poet, writer and reader. Sheila’s poetry chapbook, Shaping Time, is available for purchase on her poetry blog, She’s Writing… Sheila also blogs about her writing and reading adventures at Writing With My Eyes Closed. She lives with her husband and daughters...

Guest Post Guidelines

Guest posts are a great way to share your voice with a new audience while promoting your blog, book, and/or whatever else you have going on. If you’re interested in sharing your poetic knowledge with the Poetic Asides community, then read these guidelines to figure out how to get the ball rolling. Here’s what...

Special Guest and Book Give-Away Tomorrow!

Tomorrow, Poetic Asides will have a special guest on the blog: Sage Cohen!     If you’re not familiar with Sage, she’s the author of Writing the Life Poetic, which is one of the few books I keep on my desk at all times (right up there with my Webster’s Dictionary and 2011 Poet’s...

10 Essential Rules of Poetry

If you write poems, then you’re a poet. Simple as that. But if you want to be more than an unknown versifier who hides poems in a shoe box, here are 10 guidelines for making your mark.

by Robert Lee Brewer

Winners of the 2010 WD Poetry Awards

Karin Bradberry’s "Javelina" took first place in WD's 5th Annual Poetry Awards competition, taking home $500 in prize money. The online contest, which pulled in nearly 3,350 entries, was open to poems of any style that were original, unpublished and 32 lines or fewer.

Simile vs. Metaphor: Smackdown!

The title to this post makes it sound like I’m going to have similes breaking chairs across metaphors’ backs. Maybe metaphors will pin similes. As if. Similes and metaphors both have their uses in poetry. I don’t want to say that one is always better than the other, because they are both devices of...

How Poeming Is Like Dating

We’ve been discussing the composition of poetry on Twitter today. It sounds like many poets (including myself) tend to treat writing poetry like dating. Start off for funAt first, it’s just an image. Or an idea. Or a line. Something small and (what initially) seems unique triggers the beginning of a poem. You start to...

Poetry Workshop: 014

Okay, I haven’t tackled one of these poetry workshops in a while, so let’s look at a poem from Khara House. Here the original draft: Our daily bread, by Khara E. House Pull one thread to unravel a sweater–one thing leads to another. Hansel and Gretel scatter breadcrumb path–come the birds, eat the crumbs,lead the children...

Quality v. Quantity: Do they need each other?

Now that I’m escaping from the vacuum of National Poetry Month and another successful April Poem-A-Day Challenge, I find myself wondering about the relationship of quantity and quality in writing. Is there value in writing every day? Is a writing routine a good or bad thing for poets? Questions such as these have been...